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over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and therefore less secure nation. >> i'm to the giving up on democracy. i don't know what the alternative is. if you say a democratic government can't solve this problem, then you are saying we need a dictatorship? i dot think s. >> rose: i'm pleased to have jay fishman at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you, charlie s so good to be here. >> rose: so just pick up on overdraft, what's the urgency? and why hasn't the government, washington responded to something that most people agree stands in the way of america's economic growth and health? >> so let me size up the issue in just a few numbers. this discussion has been lots of words, precious few numbers. the baby boom generation of which i'm a member is moving in exorrably into that 65 and older time frame, between 2000 and 2010, 55 to 64, that population group gr
to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be.
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
. >> in the u.s. we've got to be able to enable long-term thinking. we've got to give institutions that are responsible the power to bring us to the next generation as opposed to tomorrow's conflicts or, you know, the conflict in a week. we've got to take what is ideaological and paralyzes us into the debatement but once somebody has power, let them lead at least for a period of time. if afterwards they get recalled by popular world so, be it. but you want a government whoever is elected to at least lead for a while so that you can progress. in europe you've got the same issues but multiplied because not only do you have it at the nation level, you have the whole construction of europe which is sort of like an unfinished building. >> where do you come down in terms of the question that europe faces and the united states faces which is there is debt. and you have to deal to debt. and but secondly, in order to create a sustainable level of trend, you have to have growth. and too much austerity inhibits growth, certainly in the short term. >> no question. so you have got to have, well
'm ready, coach, i'm locked in, i'm dedicated, committed for th next two years th team u.s.a. with you and whatever you need prefrom me i'm ready to do it. >> rose: here's what he said about you. roll tape. >> holy mackerel, carmelo, you're doing an interview with charlie rose. man, he's come a long way since learning how to play contesting defense for the u.s. team. but charlie, one of the great things, the things that makes carmelo such a fantastic basketball player is he's a war your, you know? he's as good a competitor as i coached in the seven years i've coached the u.s. national team. i love my relationship with him. he's multiing dimensional. he can play the three, four, or five for us. and he's a problem for anybody at all on these positions offensively. the cool thing and the great thing is he's strong enough, determined enough and smart enough to defend all three of those positions. the truly one of the great players in our game today. >> that's big coming from him. (laughs) >> rose: didn't get much bigger than that, does it? this is auy whs won t admiration of you and kobe a
in --. >> in the middle of the night there was a theft. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thoug to be extinc as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i kw-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought
, likely methods of attack on the u.s. homela. ge body of intelligence we got by capturing khalid sheikh mohammed and putting him through enhanced inter know,rogati thers been some f.b.i. officials that said we have this information, some of the information that he divulged we had from other sources. >> well, he was telling us the truth. >> rose: but if you had the information beforehand, was it necessary? >> so we should have killed khalid sheikh mohammed? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i'm a big believer in the interrogation program. the point is -- >> rose: b i mean go ahead. >> k.s.m. was more than anybody else objected to enhanced interrogation techniques and more than anybody else provided us with key pieces of intelligence that we needed in order to defend the nation against al qaeda. >> rose: define "enhanced interrogation." >> it was a specific set of techniques that were used, applied to detainees. every one of those techniques were used on our own people in training. through our seal program, the asian program. >> rose: including waterboarding? >> including waterboarding. a t ofamer
. the city on the other hand as a whole is, as a u.s. census bureau noted briefly, that we're growing faster than any other city in america. now forbes is says we're one of the best places to do business. and there's a lot of great stuff going on. but it going to take us time to rebuild the entire city. will you have the same exact experience in the northeast as you try to rebuild the rockaways and will you see some neighborhoods that come back faster than others and frustrations with fema getting money to the ground. the essential component is for people not to build it back like it was. to really think about what it should have always been. so for example, in concrete terms, if a school building got destroyed, instead of putting that building back and painting it like it was, build a new 21st century school. build a sustainable school, build a school system that is going to teach to knowledge-based economy. that is what we have done in new orleans because we realize that the foundations that were in place were taking us someplace where we didn't want to go. and that's why we had to reconst
the reigns then had quite a long struggle. i think part of the whole reason that the u.s., i'm sort of an amateur student of the u.s. automobile industry. i think part of the reason that it ran into trouble was way before the 1970s. it was because the founders of those companies had relinquished the reign reins to businesspeople, not product people. >> rose: buzz as soon as you say that, i would make this observation. look what happened to ford. >> yes. >> rose: c.e.o. of ford. >> yes, yeah. >> rose: -- grew newspaper the car business, was not an engineer but was a superb manager. and grea sensibily for product. and i think-- . >> rose: yeah. >> and i think that's the element that gets missed a lot of the time. in these management turnovers. and particularly for technology company. you absolutely have to have as the guiding force of an abiding enduring technology company, a person or people at the helm who have products in their dna. >>os yeah. >> who love, who are crazed by the idea of making that thing better. >> better. >> the best. or making it better or the best or have this in
-- and there is an element of even the old prussian model of some degree of inctrination, and then in the mid 1,800s the u.s., you know, famously said well we want to have universal public education, it is no coincidence. >> rose: we based it on the prussian model. >> yes, these are the industrial superpowers, they had a middle class that was educated and fundamentally didn't rethink the model i talk about in the book it was discovered to me when i did some of the research, why do you always teach physics in the 12th grade and chemistry in the 11th frayed where did this come from? and it came literally from a group of ten men 120 years ag bfore the internet or dna or anything that says people should learn gentleman only i are in the tenth grade and people should learn, three years of english and have, an it hasn't change, it has been frozen there so what we are saying is, a lot of the ideas aren't new, let's personalize the instruction to the student this is what would have been the gold standard 300 years ago and even 50 years ago if you said what is the best? well personalized instruction, now could you
to focus on the attempt to kill bin laden in tora bora in 2001 when u.s. special forces more or less had him in a one square mile box. >> rose: right. >> and the eyes of the world were on him and september 11th was so fresh in everybody's mind. it was just a couple months after that. we were working on that film for a number of years, researching it, writing it and were pretty close to actually making it and then things changed. but i think we were both curious just as americans or as citizens or what have you. >> rose: what was going on there, why did it take so long. what were they doing. how, you have america, the most powerful nation on the planet and you have this guy. and ten years. an to try to kind of unpack that and take people behind the scenes and show them what it would be like to be an intel officer, tacking bin laden and bring that intel to life. >> rose: and how they did it. >> and how they did it. >> rose: so if i go to the cia i will find a young agent that looked like jessica chastain that was at the centre of this team that found -- >> well, first of all, there are som
days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. onomy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so i'm pleased to have
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13